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Return To Paradise

For our discussion of Lake Wobegon, I propose we head up to South Fork Park again. We can meet at my place around 6:30 or 7PM on Thursday, July 21 and carpool up to the park. I can fit three comfortably, four with a little crowding in the back. I'll supply the firewood to get us started and the fixins for s'mores for everyone. It would be helpful to get a headcount so I make sure I bring enough chocolate (if such a thing as 'enough' chocolate is ever possible).

Does this sound good? Any objections/counter suggestions/complaints/etc?

Scheduling thoughts

So I think it's Scott's pick up first with Lake Wobegon in June, then Brandon in July with Horror of the Heights, then me again in August with Rocket Boys.

I leave town for 13 days on June 27, so an earlier date would work well. Glad the summer weather is back so we can be outdoors more.

Not autobahn, Audubon

Let's meet at my place and head out to the lake at 7. I think the cool temp will keep the mosquitos down but I will have bug spray just in case. On the way out or back we could get a bucket of fried chicken because that is the easiest bird I can think of to eat.

Joe Round 5

This time around I asked family members and a friend what books they think I should read. Here is the list:

The Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant

Rocket Boys by Homer Hickam Jr.

Made by Hand by Mark Frauenfelder

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy

Brandon's picks - round 5

1. The Horror of the Heights by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
A collection of tales of the supernatural.  None of which feature Sherlock Holmes, but the two that I've read before are pretty kick-butt.

2. Reality is Broken by Jane McGonigal
Explains the science behind why games are good for us--why they make us happier, more creative, more resilient, and better able to lead others in world-changing efforts.  Wait, is this for real?

3. Hard Times by Charles Dickens
I sure get a bang out of Dickens' use of the English Language, but find most of his books way too long.  This one looks more manageable.

4. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
I don't know anything about this, except it was Kara's favorite book for a long time.

5. Norwood by Charles Portis
This is the first book by the guy that wrote True Grit.

Scott's Picks, Round 5

I decided to take a different track this time around and not focus on literature but create a more eclectic mix.

1. Lake Wobegon Days by Garrison Keillor This is a renomination of one from Brandon from an earlier round. I was listening to NPR a few days ago and heard a bit of Prairie Home Companion, making me want to read something Keillor.

2. A Walk In The Woods by Bill Bryson I really enjoyed 'A Short History of Nearly Everything' and I have hiked in the Appalachians a bit, so I thought why not?

3. Desert Solitaire by Edward Abbey I know Abbey is not everyone's cup of tea, but he talks about Arches as it used to be in this book and I can relate to much of what he says regarding wilderness.

4. The Domiguez-Escalante Journal Part of Utah's (and the West's) early history I have always been curious about.

5. Beyond The hundredth Meridian by Wallace Stegner Another renomination (from Joe's picks, if I remember correctly). I thought this would be an interesting rea…

Call for entries: Round 5

Hey y'all,

Since Under a Wild Sky is the last book of round 4, it's time to start thinking about some more nominees.  Let's get them all posted and voted on by the next time we meet at the end of this month.  Myles, you gonna join us via skype from now on?

Double, double, toil and trouble

My fellow scholars and countrymen,

I propose a meeting of our happy few band of brothers, to be held on this 28th day of April.  Some outdoor location I think will serve our purposes.   The topics of discussion will be the fantastical romance of Twelfth Night, and that most harrowing of tragedies Antony and Cleopatra.  Any ideas for unquiet meals to make ill our digestion are appreciated.  Eight wild boars roasted whole at breakfast? Some pigeons, a couple of short-legged hens, a joint of mutton, and any pretty little tiny kickshaws?  And of course, the beer of root is a good familiar creature, if it be well used.



Toad in the hole and everything

Although Jude may be one of the saddest stories around, we enjoyed ourselves.  I can't believe I forgot my camera.  Pictures of Toad in the Hole and Toad in the Bayou, baguettes with Havarti, M&M medley, and cinnamon rolls belong here, but are sadly missing!

Thanks to Scott for hosting and suggesting Jude!

Quesadillas, Guacamole, and Tarts

We had an enjoyable discussion over fresh quesadillas.  No one was tempted by the jalapenos, but the poblanos were well received.

We also had the required drinks, chips and salsa, and some strawberry custard tarts.

I forgot to get pictures to document it all again!

I'm looking forward to next month's meeting for Jude the Obscure.

Repent Ye!

Brandon asked if my new calling as bishop means that I will vanish from Manly Manliness. I hope not, but I'm not off to a great start. I found out this week that on Thursday I have to attend something called welfare council with all the other bishops in the stake. It starts at 8:30. I'll head straight to Jon's place if there's still time when my meeting is through.

On a more positive note, I've lined up funds to purchase a fire bowl for the back yard.